Synecdoche is different from metonymy. synecdoche definition: 1. a word or phrase in which a part of something is used to refer to the whole of it, for example…. Perhaps it is the part itself that is more vital. The term 'synecdoche' might seem unfamiliar but you would've surely come across such words or sentences in written text.

Consider some common examples in our speech today. Synecdoche is a type of symbolism. It can be defined as a figure of speech where part of a sentence describes the entirety. Examples of Synecdoche in Literature. When a whole is used as the part or a part of a thing is put for the whole Examples: * "The world treated him badly." Example 1. Synecdoche is a figure of speech which expresses either more, or less, than it literally denotes. Synecdoche is a figure of speech where part of something is used to represent the whole thing. Synecdoche (pronounced si-NEK-di-key) is a trope or figure of speech in which a part of something is used to represent the whole (for example, ABCs for alphabet) or (less commonly) the whole is used to represent a part ("England won the World Cup in 1966"). For example, everyone knows if you tell someone to check out your new wheels, you’re referring to the car as a whole. What is Synecdoche. Examples: The word head is often used in counting cattle or people, such as in the phrase “per head.” The word sails is a part of a ship that can also be used to refer to a whole ship as an synecdoche example. The whole world did not treat him badly only a part. Synecdoche Examples. You may also see balanced sentences. The term "synecdoche" is a type of figure of speech.

One thing represents something else. A synecdoche is part of the figurative language family, which contains other figures of speech such as metaphors, similes, personification, etc. Synecdoche is a figure of speech in which, most often, a part of something is used to refer to its whole. Learn more. Find out more in this article. Writers will often use synecdoche in texts such as fictional stories, poems and songs. In literature, we see many types of figurative language, and synecdoche is a good example of this. Adjective: synecdochic, synecdochical, or … In fact, you can find many examples of a part-to-whole synecdoche used in the English language. Using synecdoche draws attention to the part instead of the whole.

Referring to a car as … - The whole is used as the part * "Twenty sails came into the harbor." We are now going to take a look at some examples of times in which synecdoche has been used as a literary device.

Synecdoche is a common element in literature from the poet who speaks of his lover in terms of her eyes and lips to the writer who provides an entire town with the mood and personality of an individual. Examples of Synecdoche in Written Language.

Synecdoche refers to the practice of using a part of something to stand in for the whole thing. It’s when you use a part of the whole of something to refer to the object. Synecdoche (pronounced si-NEK-di-key) is a trope or figure of speech in which a part of something is used to represent the whole (for example, ABCs for alphabet) or (less commonly) the whole is used to represent a part ("England won the World Cup in 1966"). This device may also be used when a smaller group is used to reference a larger group with which it is a part. Examples of Synecdoche: 1. A less common form of synecdoche occurs when a whole is used to refer to a part. In synechdoche, the part that is used to represent the whole is actually a part of the whole. Adjective: synecdochic, synecdochical, or … Synecdoche (pronounced si-nek-duh-kee) is derived from the greek word synekdoche defined as “simultaneous meaning.” The contemporary English definition of synecdoche is: a literary device where a word for a small component of something can stand in rhetorically for the larger whole, or vice versa. It can mean to use a word for a part as a whole, or an item as a substitute for an entire group, or to represent an object by its function. Synecdoche is a figure of speech that occurs throughout the bible, and once understood you will see that it would be almost impossible for us to communicate without it. Synecdoche is a special form of metonymy in which the object or idea used to describe something larger is actually a part or a component of the larger idea. Current-Day Examples Here are some common examples of the use of synecdoche that we totally understand: For example, "The captain commands one hundred sails" is a synecdoche that uses "sails" to refer to ships—ships being the thing of which a sail is a part. In the “hands” example above, it is the hands that are needed because they will be doing the work.

With metonymy, the thing that is used to represent the whole is not a part of the whole.