Feinberg identifies four liberty‐limiting, or coercion‐legitimizing, principles, each of which is the subject of a volume of his book. While on this bus ride we incur many offensives, and to get of the bus would result in great inconvenience to ourselves.


The second volume in Joel Feinberg's series The Moral Limits of the Criminal Law, Offense to Others focuses on the "offense principle," which maintains that preventing shock, disgust, or revulsion is always a morally relevant reason for legal prohibitions. Feinberg states that the offense principle seeks to prevent people from wrongfully offending others as a reason for coercive legislation (Feinberg, 1985: 2). In keeping, however, with the "motivating spirit" of Mill, Feinberg promises to maintain throughout these volumes that The second volume in Joel Feinberg's series The Moral Limits of the Criminal Law, Offense to Others focuses on the "offense principle," which maintains that preventing shock, disgust, or revulsion is always a morally relevant reason for legal prohibitions. Feinberg clarifies the concept of an "offended mental state" and further contrasts the concept of offense with harm. Feinberg’s argument for the Offense Principle rests up the “intuitive” force of a hypothetical situation in which we are asked to imagine ourselves as a passenger on a bus. In principle, there-fore, the theory could uphold prohibitions of broad scope. Feinberg embraces, with numerous qualifications, the principle of this volume, "offense to others." II. The second volume in Joel Feinberg's series The Moral Limits of the Criminal Law, Offense to Others focuses on the "offense principle," which maintains that preventing shock, disgust, or revulsion is always a morally relevant reason for legal prohibitions. The application of Feinberg’s Offense Principle is sensitive to diminish-ing tolerance, since the case for criminalization would be strengthened if greater affront were taken to an instance of behavior.

Feinberg acknowledges the need to move beyond "harm to others," the only limitation on liberty Mill accepted.

Mediating the Offense Principle Mediating the Offense Principle Chapter: (p.25) 8 Mediating the Offense Principle Source: The Moral Limits of the Criminal Law: Volume 2: Offense to Others Author(s): Joel Feinberg Publisher: Oxford University Press Offense to Others Joel Feinberg Moral Limits of the Criminal Law. The second volume in the series The Moral Limits of the Criminal Law, this book explicates the "offense principle," clarifies the concept of the "offended mental state," examines pornography and the Constitution, obscenity, and … THE OFFENSE PRINCIPLE Unlike the harm principle, the offense principle is controversial; some writers have denied that "mere" offense can ever be serious enough to warrant legal interference.8 Feinberg's first task in Offense 7 In Part III, I examine another area in which Feinberg's own intuitions seem to point toward legal moralism. Feinberg clarifies the concept of an "offended mental state" and further contrasts the concept of offense with harm. Harm to Others is the first volume in a four‐volume work entitled The Moral Limits of the Criminal Law that addresses the question, What acts may the state rightly make criminal?

Activities such